Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Who were the Regulators?

The Regulators were never a formal organization with designated members. It was an affiliation of rural farmers along the then-boundary of Orange and Rowan Counties – now eastern Randolph and Guilford Counties. As well there were many involved in the Regulation who lived in other areas of the North Carolina Piedmont.

Carole Troxler’s book includes a long list of signatories to such petitions. Jerry Cross (on behalf of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources) developed a list of these signers and their names are memorialized at the Alamance Battleground. Working from Mr. Cross's list, Wallace L McKeehan has come up with the following list of men active in the Regulator movement:

http://www.tamu.edu/faculty/ccbn/dewitt/mckstmerindivid.htm

I reprint his list here (with a few corrections of my own).  In some cases, where I have located brief references I have included a paragraph on the involvement of some of these Regulators:

Acuages, John
Adams, James
Adams, Thomas
Adams, William
Aiken, Jones
Albright, William
Aldridge, James
Aldridge, Nathan
Aldridge, Nicholas
Alexander, Thomas
Alexander, William
Allen, Joseph
Allen, Samuel
Allmond, James
Allrid, William
Almond, Edward
Almond, Seamore
Andriss, Adam
Andriss, Conrad
Armstrong, Isaac
Armstrong, James
Arnett, James F.
Arrington, Thomas
Ashley, Nathaniel
Ashley, Robert
Ashmore, Walter
Awtray, Alex
Bailey, John
Baily, Thomas
Balice, Thomas
Bannistor, William
Barber, Richard
Barber, William
Barindine, James
Barindine, William Jr. & Sr.
Barker, James
Barker, Nicholas
Barker, Samuel
Barnes, Brinsley
Barnes, James
Barnes, John
Barrett, Benjamin
Barrett, Thomas
Barton, John
Barton, William
Baxter, John
Beaty, Thomas
Beck, Jeffrey
Beel, Thomas
Belhany, Thomas
Bell, John
Bellew, Abraham
Belvin, George
Belvin, Isaac
Bennett, John
Benton, William
Bery, John
Beten, William
Bignour, James

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Billingsley, James
Bynum, James
Blake, Thomas

John Coulie and Thomas Blake are mentioned by Carruthers (page 131) as “Regulators who were spreading their principles in [Dobbs County].” (Carruthers, page 131)

Blewett, William
Bly, James
Boatman, Waterman
Boe, John
Boggan, Patrick Jr.
Boggs, Joseph
Boilston, Will
Bond, John
Bond, W.C.B.
Boothe, Charles
Boring, Joseph

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Bosil, William
Bound, James
Bradley, Abram
Bradley, Lawrence
Brady, Ayen
Branson, Ely

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770.

Branson, Thomas
Brantley, James
Braswell, Benjamin
Braswell, Richard
Bray, Edward
Bray, Henry
Brewer, Nickless
Bricks, John
Brisley, Peter
Broadway, Robert
Brooks, Isaac
Brooks, Jacob W.
Brooks, Jacob W.
Brooks, James
Brooks, James
Brooks, John
Brown, Daniel
Brown, David
Brown, James
Brown, Robert
Brown, William

William Brown was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

Brox, John
Brucham, James
Brur, Noel
Brus, John
Bruton, Samuel
Bryan, John
Buchanan, Samuel
Bullen, John
Bumpass, John

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Bunt, Benjamin
Burcham, Henry
Burcham, John
Burcham, Joseph
Burgies, James
Burns, Darass
Burns, William
Burt, William
Burtson . John
Busen, William
Bush, Stephen
Buskin, Abraham
Butler, John
Butler, William

Per NCPedia.org William Butler (fl. 1768–73) by James K. Huhta: “William Butler, farmer and insurgent, was probably born in Virginia before 1730 and was likely the son of William and Frances Watson Butler...In 1768, while living near Sandy Creek in Orange County, he was appointed a county tax collector; in 1770 he was appointed a deputy sheriff in Orange County...emerged as a principal leader of the Regulators by the late 1760s. He was central in events at Hillsborough in 1768 and 1770 and at Alamance Creek in 1771. Butler, along with two others, was declared an outlaw by the governor of North Carolina in June 1771. After the events at Alamance Creek, Butler apparently fled North Carolina and, by May 1773, settled at the ‘headwaters of Walker's Creek’ in Fincastle County, Va. In 1772, John Butler of Orange County sought unsuccessfully to obtain a pardon for his brother from Governor Josiah Martin and then warned William against planning to settle in North Carolina again." William Butler was arrested (along with Harmon Husband) as part of Fanning’s midnight raid on the Sandy Creek community in the Spring of 1768 (Carruthers, page 119) and at the September 1768 Superior Court was convicted of rioting. (Carruthers, page 128) The Regulator Docket (Orange County Superior Court Minutes, September 1770) record that “Several persons styling themselves Regulators assembled together in the court yard under the conduct of Harmon Husband, James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, Samuel Divinny, and many others…” and carried out the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 131) Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143) Rednap Howell, Harmon Husband, James Hunter and William Butler were outlawed after the Battle of Alamance. (Carruthers, page 157)
William Butler unsuccessfully prosecuted cases against local officials at the March 1769 Superior Court in Hillsborough. (Troxler page 78)

Calley, Patrick
Cain, John

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Cain, William
Capin, John
Caps, William
Carpenter, Jobs
Carr, Joseph
Cartwright, John
Caruthers, Robert
Caterham, John
Ceinght, Peter
Chafen, Joseph
Chambers, Edward
Cheek, Randolph
Cheney, Francis
Christian, Christopher
Christian, Thomas
Christman, Jacob
Cilleadon, Job
Clanton, Benjamin
Clapp, Barney
Clapp, George
Clapp, Ludwig
Clapp, Tobias
Claps John
Clark, Elijah
Clark, Joseph
Clark, Samuel

The last exchange of letters on May 15, 1771 was a communique from the Regulators, signed by John Williams, Samuel Low, James Wilson, Joseph Scott and Samuel Clark.

Clark. John
Clauton, Charles
Cochran, Benjamin W.
Cockerham, John
Code, Timothy
Colbon, James
Coleman, John
Coleman, William
Collins, Jacob
Collins, Joshua
Conkwrite, Harklis
Copeland, James

James Copeland was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

Copeland, William Jr.
Copeland, William Sr.
Coplin, Nicklos
Coplin, Thomas
Corry, John
Cortner, Peter
Coulie, John

John Coulie and Thomas Blake are mentioned by Carruthers (page 131) as “Regulators who were spreading their principles in [Dobbs County].” (Carruthers, page 131) There was a “John Gugle” indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144) Same person?

Covington, Benjamin
Cowen, John
Cox, David
Cox, Harmon

Harmon Cox was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

Cox, Joseph
Cox, Solomon
Cox, Thomas
Cox, William

William Cox was appointed to represent the Deep River area at the meeting at Maddocks Mill appointed for 10 Oct 1768. (Carruthers, page 109)

Craswell, John
Craswell, William
Craven, John
Craven, Joseph
Craven, Peter

Peter Craven was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75)  Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Craven, Thomas
Creaton, Patrick

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Creeson, Abraham

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Crofts, Solomon
Croswell, Gilbard
Croswell, John
Croswell, William
Crow, John
Crow, Mansfield
Culberson, Andrew
Culberson, Samuel
Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)
Culpepper, Daniel
Culpepper, John
Culpepper, Thompson
Culpepper, William
Curie, Ezekel
Curie, John

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Curtiss, Samuel
Dark, Samuel
Davis, Enoch
Davis, Gabriel
Davis, James
Davis, John
Davis, Jonathan
Davis, Matthew
Davis, Robert
Davis, Thomas
Davis, William
Debury, Samuel
Delap, James
Delap, Robert
Denson, James
Denson, Shadrach
Deviney, Samuel

Tried (along with Husband and Butler) at Hillsborough in September 1768. The Regulator Docket (Orange County Superior Court Minutes, September 1770) record that “Several persons styling themselves Regulators assembled together in the court yard under the conduct of Harmon Husband, James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, Samuel Divinny, and many others…” and carried out the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 131) Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143)

Digges, William
Dinkins, Thomas
Dinkins, William
Dison, Charlie
Dixon, Simon
Dobbins, Jacob
Donner, Thomas
Dorset, Francis
Dowas, Richard
Dowd, Dyer
Dowdy, Daniel
Dray, Jacob
Drinkin, William
Duckworth, Jeremiah
Dumas, Benjamin
Dumas, David
Dunham, John
Dunn, Bartholomew
Dunn, John
Dunn, Simon Jr.

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Dunn, William

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Edwards, Joshua
Edwards, Meager
Ellis, James
Emmerson, James

James Emmerson was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

English, Joseph
English, Matthew
English, William
Erwin, John
Estress, George
Estress, William
Evans, Aaron
Evans, James
Falconbery, Andrew
Falconbery, Henry
Falconbery, Isaac Jr.
Falconbery, Isaac Sr.
Falconbery, John
Fall, Christen
Fanning, John
Fanning, Thomas Jr.
Fanning, Thomas Sr.
Fany, William
Few, Benjamin
Few, James

James Few was hung on the battlefield immediately following the Battle of Alamance. Few is said to have been motivated especially by personal animosity toward Edmund Fanning who had “seduced” Few’s fiancĂ©e. (Carruthers, page 158)

Few, William Sr.
Fielding, William
Fields, Jeremiah & William

Jeremiah Fields and his brother William were both leaders in the Regulation. Jeremiah acted as spokesman for the Regulators during the 1768 raid on the courthouse in Hillsborough. A third brother – Robert is said to have also been active. The three were children when their widowed mother moved them and 4 other siblings from Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania to North Carolina in the mid to early 1750’s. Jane Field received her grant from Lord Granville in 1755ish. Jane’s husband William Field is buried in an Anglican graveyard in Virginia. During the Revolution, William Field and others in his family remained loyal to the Crown - as William later explained, he felt duty bound to uphold the oath he took after the Battle of Alamance. Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Jeremiah Field stood up in court in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770 as spokesman for the Regulators. (Troxler page 87)

Fike, John
Fike, Malachy

Malachi Fike was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Filker, Jacob
Firnier, Marton
Flake, Thomas

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Flake, Samuel
Flemmin, John
Forbis, John
Fortenbury, Henry
Fortenbury, John
Foshea, Joseph
Fox, Thomas
Franklin, Leonard
French, Joseph
French, Neal
Fruit, John

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770.

Fudge, Jacob
Fuller, John
Fuller, Josua
Fuller, Thomas
Futrelle, Thomas
Gappen, John

Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143)

Gardner, Parish
Garran, James
Gaylord, Samuel
Garner, Thomas
George, Joseph
Gibson, James
Gibson, Silverster
Gibson, Walter
Gibson, William
Gideon, Gilbert Jr.
Gideon, Gilbert Sr.
Gilbert Joshua
Gilbert, Jonathan
Gillespie, Daniel

Fought at the Battle of Alamance. (Carruthers, page 171) The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)


Gillespie, John

Fought at the Battle of Alamance. (Carruthers, page 171)

Gillmore, William
Gilmer, John
Ginil, Peter
Glase, Christian
Glase, George
Glase, Philip Jr.
Glase, Philip Sr.
Glase, Powel
Glover, Thomas
Goble, George
Goble, John
Goble, Nicholas
Goff, Solomon

Solomon Goff was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Goldstone, Charles
Gordon, Frank
Gortner, George
Gowers, Jonathan
Gowers, Thomas
Graham, James

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Graves, John
Graves, Thomas
Green, William
Greers, William
Griffin, Andrew
Griffin, James
Grigg, Jacob
Gring, Fagan
Gross, Solomon
Grubbs, Benjamin
Grubbs, John
Gugle, John
Hadley, James A.
Hadley, Jesse
Hadley, Joshua
Hadley, Simeon
Haley, Isam
Haley, Silas
Haley, William Jr.
Haley, William Sr.
Hamilton, Archibald
Hamilton, Hanson

In the Spring of 1769, Orange Co Sheriff John Lea was beaten by John Pugh while the Sheriff had been attempting to serve a warrant on Hanson Hamilton. (Carruthers, page 129)

Hamilton, Matthew

Matthew Hamilton was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75)  Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143)

Hamilton, Ninian

Ninian Hamilton was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Hamilton, Ninian Bell

Ninian Bell Hamilton was “an old Scotchman, 60 or 708 years of age” who organized the Regulators’ march on Hillsborough to free Harmon Husband following Fanning’s Spring 1768 raid on the Sandy Creek community. (Carruthers, page 122) Hamilton was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Hamilton, Thomas
Hammer, Abraham
Harden, Stephen
Haridon, James

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Harland, Aaron
Harland, Reuben
Harlow, Eron
Harmon, Zach
Harper, Abraham
Harper, Samuel
Harper, Thomas
Harris, Joseph
Harrison, Jesse
Harrison, Joseph
Hart, John
Hartso, Philip
Hartso, John

John Hartso was tried (along with Husband and Butler) at Hillsborough in September 1768. Seriously?

Helms, Jonathan
Helms, Tilmon
Henderson, Argulus
Henderson, John
Henderson, William
Hendry, George
Hendrye, Thomas Jr.
Hendrye, Thomas Sr.
Henry, George
Henson, Charles
Henson, John
Henson, Joseph
Henson, Joseph
Henson, William
Herndon, James
Herndon, James
Herring, Delany
Herrman, Henry
Hickman, William
Hielerman, Nicholas
Higgins, James
Higgins, John
Higgins, William
Hill, Thomas
Hilton, Abraham
Hilton, John
Hindes, Joseph
Hines, Charles
Hinsinbru, Jason Iron
Hintrand, William
Hogins, Thadwick
Hogon, William Griffin
Holley, Julius
Honest, Michael
Hopper, Thomas
Hore, William
Horn, Jacob
Hornbeck, John
Howard, Nehemiah
Howe, John
Howell, Rednap

Per NCPedia.org article by Elmer D. Johnson Rednap Howell (d. 1787): “Rednap Howell, ‘poet of the Regulators,’ moved to North Carolina from New Jersey, probably in the early 1760s. He settled first in present Chatham County, then moved about 1768 to what is now Randolph County. Howell is supposed to have been a teacher and certainly was well educated for his time. He wrote several ‘Regulator poems’ satirizing the men and events associated with the Regulator uprising in North Carolina from 1768 to 1771…Howell first appeared on the Regulator scene in May 1768 as one of the signers of a petition to Governor William Tryon, stating the grievances of the western North Carolina farmers against the appointed county officials. Howell and James Hunter carried the petition to Tryon, who refused to hear their grievances and demanded that the Regulators pay their taxes and obey the laws of the province…In September 1770, they prevented court from being held in Hillsborough, the seat of Orange County. Howell was later indicted in connection with this incident…In January 1771 Howell learned that Herman Husband, another Regulator leader, had been imprisoned in New Bern and began raising a force to release him. Because Husband was released by the court, the expedition did not take place…Howell was present at the beginning of the Battle of Alamance, but is thought to have left the field without taking part in the fighting. Nevertheless, he was outlawed by Governor Tryon and a reward was offered for his capture, dead or alive. After Alamance, Howell fled to Maryland and later returned to New Jersey, where he died. As far as is known, he never married.” James Hunter and Rednap Howell waited in Brunswick to petition the Governor on behalf of the Regulators in June 1768. (Carruthers, page 124) Howell was from New Jersey, was a schoolmaster and is thought to be the poet of the Regulators. (Carruthers, page 129) The Regulator Docket (Orange County Superior Court Minutes, September 1770) record that “Several persons styling themselves Regulators assembled together in the court yard under the conduct of Harmon Husband, James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, Samuel Divinny, and many others…” and carried out the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 131) Rednap Howell, while out proselytizing for the Regulators in Halifax County wrote to James Hunter in February 1771 to report on his efforts, though the letter was intercepted by Gov. Tryon’s supporters. (Carruthers, page 138) Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143) Rednap Howell, Harmon Husband, James Hunter and William Butler were outlawed after the Battle of Alamance. (Carruthers, page 157)

Hunter, James

James Hunter and Rednap Howell waited in Brunswick to petition the Governor on behalf of the Regulators in June 1768. (Carruthers, page 124) Hunter was also one of three signers of a letter on behalf of the Regulators to Gov. Tryon in late summer 1768. (Carruthers, page 127) James Hunter was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75)  The Regulator Docket (Orange County Superior Court Minutes, September 1770) record that “Several persons styling themselves Regulators assembled together in the court yard under the conduct of Harmon Husband, James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, Samuel Divinny, and many others…” and carried out the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 131) Rednap Howell, while out proselytizing for the Regulators in Halifax County wrote to James Hunter in February 1771 to report on his efforts, though the letter was intercepted by Gov. Tryon’s supporters. (Carruthers, page 138) Gov Tryon had indictments handed down against William Butler, John Gappen, Samuel Divinney, James Hunter, Matthew Hamilton and Rednap Howell for their alleged roles in the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 143) Rednap Howell, Harmon Husband, James Hunter and William Butler were outlawed after the Battle of Alamance. (Carruthers, page 157)

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

James Hunter sued Edmund Fanning and Michael Holt II in Hillsborough in March 1770, losing to Fanning, but prevailing over Holt. (Troxler page 85)

Inyard, John 

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Jackson, Isaac
Jones, Samuel 

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Julian, Peter

Peter Julian was one of three signers of a letter on behalf of the Regulators to Gov. Tryon in late summer 1768. (Carruthers, page 127)
The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Laws, Dan
Layn, Marveric
Leak, Richard
Leary, William
Leaton, William
Leveritt, John
Leveritt, William
Liles, James
Liles, John
Lille, Muicher
Lindley, Thomas
Linterman, Henry

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Litten, Mincher
Llewellyn, Jonathan
Lloyd, Iomond
Lloyd, Thomas
Locke, Matthew

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Logan, Andrew
Long, John
Lord, Lewis
Lowe, James

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Lowe, John
Lowe, Samuel

The last exchange of letters on May 15, 1771 was a communique from the Regulators, signed by John Williams, Samuel Low, James Wilson, Joseph Scott and Samuel Clark.

Lowery, James
Lowery, Lewis
Lowery, Robert
Lucas, William Jr.
Luin, John
Mackejh, James
MacPherson, William
Macvay, John
Maner, Richard
Marchbanks, George
Marfay, Roger
Marmane, Larence
Marsevaine, John
Marshall, Jacob
Marshall, John
Martin, Joseph
Martin, Zachariah
Mason, John
Mason, Ralph
Mason, Thomas Jr.
Mason, Thomas Sr.
Mateer, Robert

Per Some Neglected History of North Carolina by W.E. Fitch, 1905: “Robert Matear, one of the unfortunate victims, was a quiet, inoffensive, upright man, who had never joined the Regulators . . . According to Caruthers in his Life of Caldwell, a few years before the battle he went to Newberne to sell a load of produce, and Tryon, having learned where he was from, as there were no mail lines in those days, made him the bearer of a letter to Alexander Martin at Salisbury . . . he opened the letter on the road as he was returning home and read it. He was so disgusted with the haughtiness and tyranny which it manifested, that he handed it over to one of his neighbors who was friendly to the Regulators. Through their carelessness or intemperate zeal, it became known, and was the sole cause of his death.” Robert Mateer was co-emissary (along with Robert Thompson) from the Regulators to the Governor at the last moment befor the Battle of Alamance. The shooting began while Mateer and Thompson were in the Governor’s camp. Mateer escaped, but Thompson was killed on the spot (by Tryon himself, as the story goes). (Carruthers, pages 153, 164) 

The following were hanged at Hillsborough on June 19, 1771: James Pugh, Robert Messer, Benjamin Merrill and Robert Mateer. (Troxler page 117)

Mathew, Ned
Mathews, Anthony
Mathews, James
Mathews, John
Mathin, Anthony
Maudlin, Benjamin
Maudlin, John
Maudlin, Jonie
McCaul, James
McCay, Daniel
McClewland, John
McCoy, Archibald
McCoy, John
McDaniel, Jacob
McIlvailly, John
McMeot, James
McNish, John
McPherson, Alexander
McPherson, Joseph

Joseph McPherson came to what is now Chatham County in 1765 and witnessed many events of the Regulation. Joseph and two of his brothers were at the Battle of Alamance and his eyewitness account is related in Carruthers at pages 112 & 155. MsPherson was also on hand when the Regulators descended on Hillsborough in September 1768 and snuck into tot own to discuss Harmon Husbands fate with Edmund Fanning. (Troxler page 74) 

McQuinton, John
McSwaine, Patrick
Meadow, Jason Jr.
Meadow, Jason Sr.
Melon, Thomas
Melton, Jeremiah
Mercer, Forester

Forester Mercer was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

Merns, Thomas
Merree, John II
Merrill, Benjamin

Per History of the Liberty Baptist Association by Elder Henry Sheets, 1907 (page 158): Capt. Benjamin Merrill, of the Jersey settlements near Salisbury...was on his way to join the Regulators at Alamance, with a company of more than three hundred men, when he intercepted Gen. Hugh Waddell and forced him to flee to Salisbury, after taking most of his command prisoners. Captain Merrill was within one day's march of the Alamance when he heard the cannonading, and soon afterwards heard of the victory of the Governor's army. He is said to have regretted that he was not present with his men to have bled with those who fought for liberty. After hearing of the defeat of his comrades he disbanded his men and returned home. He was taken prisoner by a detachment under Colonel Fanning, and brought to Tryon's army, encamped at 'Jersey Settlement Camp,' on Saturday, June 1, 1771; to the west of the Jersey settlement near the Yadkin River, and put in chains with the other prisoners and dragged through the country to Hillsborough, where with his life he paid the forfeit. In this trying situation he gave his friends satisfactory evidence that he was prepared to die, for he not only professed faith in Christ, his hope of heaven, and his willingness to go, but sang a psalm very devoutly, like the Covenanters in the grass market in Edinburgh, and died like a Christian and soldier. On being permitted to speak just before the execution, he said that fifteen years previously he had been converted, but had back-slidden, yet now felt that he was freely forgiven and that he would not change places with any one on the grounds. In conclusion he referred feelingly to his wife and eight children, saying, 'I entreat that no reflection be cast upon them on my account'; and requested that some part of his estate be spared for the widow and fatherless. It is said that one of Tryon's soldiers was heard to declare that if all men went to the gallows with a character such as Captain Merrill's, "hanging would be an honorable death." If Captain Merrill with his three hundred men had reached the Alamance the day before the battle, the Regulators would have had a commanding officer, and the result might have been quite different from what it was…[Benjamin Merrill’s] plantation, on which was his home, was some four miles south of Lexington, NC and about two miles east from Jersey Church. The writer recently visited the spot where once stood the residence of Captain Merrill…It is said that our hero was a gunsmith, and that the strong branch running at the foot of the hill near where his residence stood afforded the power necessary to operate the simple machinery used in boring out the barrels. In the evening he would arrange a barrel for boring and start his crude machinery and leave it running all night.

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

The following were hanged at Hillsborough on June 19, 1771: James Pugh, Robert Messer, Benjamin Merrill and Robert Mateer. (Troxler page 117)

Messer, Captain

Per Some Neglected History of North Carolina by W.E. Fitch, 1905: “Captain Messer, who, as you remember, was captured just after the battle, along with the poor unfortunate Few, who was hanged on the battle-field without trial by jury or by court martial, was to have been hanged the following day, but owing to a very affecting incident already noted, he was reserved for the Hillsborough fete, June 19, 1771.” Same tale told. (Carruthers, page 166)
The following were hanged at Hillsborough on June 19, 1771: James Pugh, Robert Messer, Benjamin Merrill and Robert Mateer. (Troxler page 117)

Miles, Charles
Miles, John Jr.
Miles, John Sr.
Miles, Thomas
Miller, Jero
Mills, John
Mims, John
Mims, Thomas
Mims, William
Mitchell, William
Moffitt, James
Moffitt, William

William Moffitt was appointed to represent the Deep River area at the meeting at Maddocks Mill appointed for 10 Oct 1768. (Carruthers, page 109) Moffitt among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Montgomery, Captain

Carruthers (citing the Weekly Times) says that Captain Montgomery “commanded a company of mountain boys” at the Battle of Alamance and was killed early in the engagement.

Moon, Thomas
Moore, Edward
Moore, Thomas
Moorman, Bennakia
Moorman, Thomas
Morgan, Goin C.
Morgan, James
Morgan, John
Morgan, Ruddy
Morgan, Solomon
Morris, Edward
Morris, John
Morris, Joseph
Morris, William Jr.
Morris, William Sr.
Morrow, William
Moses, Adam
Muchecenes, Larence
Mullen, Patrick
Murphy, John
Murphy, John
Murray, James
Nanit, George
Nation, Christopher

Christopher Nation (son of John Sr) was a Quaker who came to Rowan County (perhaps from Hopewell Virginia) to the New Graden Meeting sometime 1761 perhaps as early as 1751. In 1768, Christopher Nation was among 22 Regulars assembled at Hillsborough who petitioned Governor Tryon to pardon the Regulators past excesses, but Nation (along with James Hunter, Ninion Hamilton, Peter Craven, Isaac Jackson, Harmon Husband, Matthew Moffit, Christopher Nation, Solomon Cross and John Oneal ) were exempt from the offer of pardon which Governor Tryon issued in response on October 3, 1768.  Christopher Nation was elected to the House of Representatives from Rowan County at the same time that Harmon Husband was elected from Orange County in the voter uprising of 1769. About which election Henry Eustace McCulloh wrote to Colonel John Harvey  on 30 Mar 1770: “‘I thank you for the journal of your political proceedings:-the madness of the people must be great indeed, to trust such wretches as Harmon Husbands and Christopher Nation, as their representatives;--but it is a comfort, that violent mad fits seldom last long.’  Nation moved to Stokes County, NC after the Revolution, and by 1800 was in the Greenville District of South Carolina. (summarized from http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/VICKERY/2000-01/0946855263)

Needham, Thomas
Needham, William
Nelson, Dennis Jr.
Nelson, Dennis Sr.
Nelson, Thomas
Newberry, William
Noe, John
Norton, William
Odle, Nehemiah
Oliver, James
O'Neal, John

John O'Neal was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Owens, Stephen
Paine, William
Par, John
Park, Joseph
Parks, Samuel
Parsons, George

George Parsons molded bullets in anticipation of the Battle of Alamance and fought there. (Carruthers, page 156)

Paterson, John
Paygee, John
Paygee, William
Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Payne, William

William Payne was among those who were not allowed to take the Governor's offer of pardon in 1768. (Troxler page 75) 

Pelyou, Abraham
Penton, John
Person, Thomas

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Phelps, David
Phipps, John
Phipps, Joseph
Pickett, Edward
Pickral, Henry
Piecock, Stephen
Piles, John
Pilgrim, Amos
Pleourt, John
Polk, Thomas
Pooey, Francis
Pooey, Umfrey
Porter, James
Poston, J. Jr.
Poston, Jonathan
Powell, Nathaniel
Preslar, Thomas
Preslie, John
Prestwood, Augustine
Pryor, John

Regulator candidate elected in July 1769 as Harmon Husband’s seatmate. (Troxler page 79)

Pugh, Enoch
Pugh, James

Per Some Neglected History of North Carolina by W.E. Fitch, 1905: "During the battle, James Pugh, gunsmith by trade, - who had repaired many of the Regulators' guns prior to the fight, -  a sharpshooter and a brother in law of Harmon Husband, with three other men, securely protected by a ledge of rocks and a large tree on the edge of a ravine, did great execution with rifles. Pugh, being a crack sharpshooter, did the firing, while the other three men did the loading for him. He killed fifteen of Tryon's artillerymen. Although the cannon were directed against Pugh and his assistants, they could not be driven from their position; but at length they were surrounded. Pugh was taken prisoner. The others made their escape, and Pugh was tried for treason and executed a month later at Hillsborough." Similar account, Carruthers, page 156. Pugh was a gunsmith etc. (Carruthers, page 165)

The following were hanged at Hillsborough on June 19, 1771: James Pugh, Robert Messer, Benjamin Merrill and Robert Mateer. (Troxler page 117)

Pugh, Jesse
Pugh, John

In the Spring of 1769, Orange Co Sheriff John Lea was beaten by John Pugh while the Sheriff had been attempting to serve a warrant on Hanson Hamilton. (Carruthers, page 129)

Pugh, Thomas
Raiford, Matthew Jr.
Raiford, Matthew Sr.
Raines, John
Ramsay, James
Ramsay, John
Ramsouer, Michael
Ranetalor, Thomas
Raney, William
Rankin, William

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Ratcliff, Elisha R.
Ratcliff, Sam Jr.
Ratcliff, Samuel
Ray, Samuel
Rennolds, Peth
Richardson, Joseph
Richardson, Sam
Richerson, Peter
Riddle, thomas
Roberson, Thomas
Robertson, James
Robeson, William

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Robins, James
Robinson, Charles
Robinson, Luke
Robinson, Tirey
Rogers, Hyram
Rogers, jacob
Rogers, Josiah
Rogers, Sion
Rogers, William
Roles, Damsey
Rollins, Drury
Round, James
Routh, Joseph
Rudd, Burlingham
Ruine, David
Rushen, Mark
Ryan, John
Ryle, John
Sally, George A.
Sanders, David
Sanders, James
Sanders, Thomas E.
Sanders, William
Sanderson, Reuben

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Sands, Richard
Sappenfield, Matthias
Saxon, Benjamin
Saxon, Charles
Schwenck, Matthew
Scott, Joseph

The last exchange of letters on May 15, 1771 was a communique from the Regulators, signed by John Williams, Samuel Low, James Wilson, Joseph Scott and Samuel Clark.

Searcy, Reuben
Self, Job
Sellars, Thomas
Senderman, Henry
Shaw, Philip Jr.
Shaw, Philip Sr.
Shepherd, John
Shoemaker, Conrad
Shor, John
Short, Daniel
Short, James
Short, William
Sidden, William
Sidewell, John
Sike, Christian
Simmons, John
Sims, George
Sitton, Philip
Skin, Samuel
Skinner, John
Skipper, Barnabee
Skipper, George
Slaughter, Owen
Smith, Abner
Smith, Alexander
Smith, Benjamin
Smith, Charles
Smith, Daniel

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Smith, David
Smith, David
Smith, Edward

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Smith, Francois
Smith, Henry
Smith, James

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Smith, John
Smith, Moses
Smith, Peter
Smith, Richard
Smith, Robert
Smith, Thomas H

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

Smith, Will
Smith, Zachariah
Snider, John
Sondhill, John S.
Soots, Jacob
Sounders, Patrick
Southerland, Raleigh
Sowel, John
Sowel, Lewis
Sowel, William
Sowell, Charles S.
Sowell, Sam
Spinks, William
Springfellow, William
Stewart, James

James Stewart was convicted at Hillsborough in 1771, but pardoned by Governor Tryon. (Troxler page 117)

Stewart, John
Stinkberry, John
Stinton, Eron
Stokes, Henry
Stollie, Jacob
Strader, Henry
Stringer, John
Strongfellow, William
Stroud, Abraham
Suggs, John T.
Sutton, John
Sweany, James
Sweany, Joseph
Swearinger, Samuel
Swearinger, Thomas
Swearinger, Thomas
Swearington, Van
Swift, Thomas
Swing, Barnet
Swing, Lodwick
Swor, John Jr.
Swor, John Sr.
Swor, Jonathan Jr.
Tallant, Moses M.
Tallant, Thomas
Tapley, Hosea
Taylor, thomas
Teague, Abraham
Teague, Edward
Teague, Elijah
Teague, John
Teague, Joshua

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Teague, Moses
Teague, William
Telfair, Jacob

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Temply, Frederick
Thomas, John
Thomas, Samuel
Thomas, Zekial
Thompson, Elisha
Thompson, John
Thompson, Robert

Robert Thompson was apparently acting as a last minute emissary from the Regulators to Governor Tryon immediately before the Battle of Alamance, when the battle itself broke out. Tryon reputedly shot Thompson as he attempted to flee. (Carruthers, page 153)

Thompson, Samuel
Thompson, William
Thorn, Robert
Thornsbury, Edward
Thornsbury, William
Thornton, Abraham
Thornton, Thomas
Thorton, David
Thredhill, William
Tomlinson, Turner
Tomson, William
Tonenberg, Samuel
Torrance, John
Touchberry, John
Tree, Thomas
Treneen, William
Trull, Thomas
Tukins, Timothy
Turner, Jonathan
Tynor, William
Upton, James
Ussery, Thomas
Ussery, Welcome
Ussery, William
Vernon, Amos
Vickery, John

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Vickery, Marmaduke

Marmaduke Vickery (c 1715 – 1788, m Elizabeth Swaim c1740) arrived in North Carolina sometime before 1757 when he received a survey from Granville for 151 acres in what is now Randolph County. He may have been in NC as early as 1753. Vickery is said to have been an active Regulator, and he was among the captured Regulators who were paraded through the Moravian settlements in chains. (Carruthers, page 160) However, he was not executed at the Court Martial in Hillsborough, pledging his allegiance to the Crown. Marmaduke and Elizabeth had at least eight children two of whom married into the Swaim family and two others into the Robbins family, while yet another married one of the Nation boys.

Vonstraver, Peter
Wade, Henry

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Wagner, Samuel

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Wainscott, Isaac
Walker, John
Walker, Silvanus
Walker, William
Walkers, Robert
Walkinford, Charles
Wallas, Jesse
Waller, Thomas
Walsh, Walter
Ward, William Jr.
Ward, William Sr.
Warse, Hysom
Watson, Jacob
Watson, William Jr.
Watts, John
Watts, Malachi
Webb, Beaty
Webb, John
Webb, Joseph
Webb, Leonard
Webb, Richard
Webb, Robert
Webb, William
Wed, John
Welch, Henry
Welch, Walter
Wellborn, Thomas
Whit, Ulrich
White, Augustine
White, Charles
White, James
White, James
White, John
White, Joseph
White, William
Whitt, Jacob
Wilborn, Thomas

Thomas Wilborn (or Welborn) one of three signers of a letter on behalf of the Regulators to Gov. Tryon in late summer 1768. (Carruthers, page 127) Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144) The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Wilcox, John

John Wilcox was a Quaker (or former Quaker) businessman from Wilmington who was a close friend and associate of Harmon Husband.  Wilcox was involved in the iron works on the Deep River in what would soon become Chatham County.  (Carruthers, page 118) He interceded with Husband in the summer of 176x to persuade him to stand trial that Fall, though Wilcox would later regret his decision, fearing that Husband would be executed. Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Wilkerson, James Sr.

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Wilkins, Alexander
Wilkins, John
Wilkins, Robert
Wilkins, William
Willet, James
William, John
Williams, Eshmael
Williams, James
Williams, John

The last exchange of letters on May 15, 1771 was a communique from the Regulators, signed by John Williams, Samuel Low, James Wilson, Joseph Scott and Samuel Clark.

Williams, Nehemiah
Williams, Samuel
Williams, Solomon
Williams, Theofilis
Wills, James
Wilson, George
Wilson, James

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143) The last exchange of letters on May 15, 1771 was a communique from the Regulators, signed by John Williams, Samuel Low, James Wilson, Joseph Scott and Samuel Clark.

Wilson, John
Wilson, Thomas
Wineham, Richard
Winkler, John

Following the Battle of Alamance, the following were excluded from Governor Tryon’s 1771 offer of pardon: Samuel Jones, Joshua Teague, Samuel Waggoner, Simon Dunn Jr, Abraham Creeson, Benjamin Merrill, James Wilkinson Sr, Edward Smith, John Bumpass, Joseph Boring, William Rankin, William Robeson, John Winkler, John Wilcox, Jacob Telfair and Thomas Person. (Carruthers, page 158)

Winter, Daniel
Wood, Nathaniel
Wood, Robert
Woodward, Reuben
Woody, Robert
Word, Thomas
Wren, Prusley
Wright, Philbert
Wright, Thomas
Wyley, Hugh
Yeamons, Stokey
York, Robinson

Indicted for assaulting John Williams during the Hillsborough Riot of 1770. (Carruthers, page 144)

York, Seymour

At the Hillsborough Riot of 1770, the assembled Regulators installed their own Judge and Clerk of Court. While history does not record who presided over this mock court, the Carruthers tells us that clerk was a man named Yorke (page 133), who was likely Seymour or a close relative of him. 

Young, Samuel 

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)

Youngblood, John
Younger, James
Zagur, Joshua

The Rowan County officials attempted to settle matters with the Regulators at a March 1771 meeting which included the following Regulators: James Hunter, John Inyard, William Welborn, Thomas Fluke [Flake], John Cunny, James Wilson, Samuel Waggoner, David Gillespie, James Graham, Henry Wade, Peter Julian, Jeremiah Fields, John Vickery, Samuel Jones & Joshua Zagur. (Carruthers, page 142) At the meeting, the Regulators appointed their delegates for settling the issues at a future meeting: Matthew Locke, Harmon Husband, James Smith, James Hunter, Samuel Young, Thomas Person, John Cain, and James Graham. (Carruthers, page 143)